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MRI Results...

So last week I had a CT brain and spine - all normal (except for incidental finding of kidney stones!)

This week I had my MRI which found "several (7) non-specific white matter hyperintensities - the largest in the frontal lobe. None found in the corpus callosum or temporal lobes. My GP has suspected MS from the start. It also notes that these hyperintensities are significantly more numerous than are typically seen in a person of my age (23)

She has made an appointment for me to see a neurologist on the 4th of March so hopefully I get some answers then.

Anyone else had similar findings on MRI and get a diagnosis of MS? 

Ben
I have MS

Hi there Shootforthemoon,

I'm afraid a diagnosis of MS is rarely as simple as one MRI result; the symptoms overlap with so many other conditions.

The 4th of March isn't long to wait for a neuro appointment, so at least things are moving along for you. I suggest you take a bullet list of important symptoms and questions you want to ask, it's pretty annoying to remember something five minutes after you've left.

Hope you get some answers,

Ben

 

I have MS

Hello

What Ben has said is exactly right. Only a neurologist can take a history from you, do a physical examination, read the MRI scans and diagnose MS, diagnose a different neurological illness, or make the clinical judgement that there is no neurological disease. 

Having notes with you of symptoms is really helpful. Writing out a brief timeline of what has happened to you and when is a good plan. I would also suggest taking someone you trust with you to the appointment on the 4th March. They can act as a ‘spare brain’.

What quite often happens when you see a neurologist, especially for the first few appointments, is that your brain decides it’s a good time to take a little holiday. So you forget important things to say or ask. And you end up leaving the room asking ‘what just happened?’, ‘what happens next, did s/he say?’, and ‘what about X,Y,Z?’ I call this phenomenon neurologistitis. So a spare brain comes in quite handy. 

Let us know what happens at the neurologists appointment. And if you have any thoughts, questions, worries in the meantime, just ask for help. We’ll try to assist.

Sue